Do Vitamins Really Improve Health?

Assortment of vitamin pills

Do Vitamins Really Improve Health?

I’ve known for a long time that Vitamins are pointless. Plenty of medical experts and studies have been stating this for years, but the marketing is hard to fight. Watch this video for more info and follow up on the links that they shared below.

Vitamin supplements are everywhere, touting that a normal food diet doesn’t provide the entire nutrition we need. Supplementing with vitamins will make us healthier and will prolong our lives. But is this actually true? And could we be doing more harm than good by swallowing all these extracts each day?

via Do Vitamins Really Improve Health? – YouTube.

Info from the Video

Vitamin supplements: good or bad?

http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/dietandnutrition/feature/vitamins.htm

"Almost one in three people in the UK take a vitamin supplement every day, according to the Food Standards Authority, while 15 per cent of us turn to high-dose supplements for a quick fix."

The Vitamin Myth: Why We Think We Need Supplements

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/07/the-vitamin-myth-why-we-think-we-need-supplements/277947/

"Nutrition experts contend that all we need is what's typically found in a routine diet."

Vitamin and Mineral Supplements: Do We Really Need Them?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3309636/

In the United States, 40 – 50% of the men and women 50 years of age or older regularly use multivitamin/mineral (MVM) supplements, making the annual sales of these supplements over $11 billion.

Antioxidant supplements for prevention of gastrointestinal cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15464182

"Oxidative stress can cause cancer. Our aim was to establish whether antioxidant supplements reduce the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer and mortality."

The Effect of Vitamin E and Beta Carotene on the Incidence of Lung Cancer and Other Cancers in Male Smokers

http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJM199404143301501

"Epidemiologic evidence indicates that diets high in carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables, as well as high serum levels of vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) and beta carotene, are associated with a reduced risk of lung cancer."

Multivitamin use and risk of prostate cancer in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17505071

"Multivitamin supplements are used by millions of Americans because of their potential health benefits, but the relationship between multivitamin use and prostate cancer is unclear."

Hold the supplements

http://www1.umn.edu/news/features/2011/UR_CONTENT_363761.html

"Dietary supplements fail to prove of any benefit."

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